Monday, May 25, 2015

Community Meeting Set for Tuesday May 26 at Global Mall Event Center regarding Proposed Consolidation of all Nashville Jails to Southeast Nashville

Community Meeting Set for Tuesday May 26 at Global Mall Event Center regarding Proposed Consolidation of all Nashville Jails to Southeast Nashville
http://www.scrippsmedia.com/newschannel5/news/Community-Meeting-Planned-To-Discuss-Jail-Relocation-304873531.htmlhttp://www.scrippsmedia.com/newschannel5/news/Community-Meeting-Planned-To-Discuss-Jail-Relocation-304873531.html
CREATED May 24, 2015
ANTIOCH, Tenn. – A community meeting has been set to discuss the possible relocation of the Davidson County Jail.
In April, Mayor Karl Dean and Sheriff Daron Hall announced plans to move the jail to an area off Harding Place.
Since then, neighbors have been voicing their opinion.
For those wanting to attend, the southeast community meeting has been scheduled from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Global Mall event center.

Residents of southeast Nashville declare opposition to move of CJC

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – Residents of southeast Nashville and Antioch have officially declared their opposition to the proposed relocation of the Criminal Justice Center.
Southeast Nashville United called for Mayor Karl Dean, elected city council representatives, the police department and sheriff’s office to begin an ongoing dialogue with south Nashville residents, explore other relocation sites and keep the CJC where it is in downtown Nashville through the process.
Residents cite five things moving the sheriff’s facilities to their neighborhood will do, including permanently stigmatizing Antioch as an area for incarceration.
They also said it would establish Antioch as the only area of Nashville with the responsibility for housing prisoners.
Southeast Nashville United believes the move would also hinder economic development in the area but making it less attractive to desirable businesses, as well as attract undesirable businesses like bail bonding and cash advance companies.
The residents also fear prisoners will be released directly into their neighborhoods.
The neighborhood group is holding a meting Tuesday, May 26 at the Global Mall at the Crossings event center on Hickory Hollow Parkway at 6 p.m.
They are inviting Mayor Dean, Sheriff Daron Hall, the Metro Council, and many other lawmakers and officials with Capital Project Solutions, a Nashville-based project management company.
Earlier this month, Sheriff Hall addressed many of the community’s concerns in a public meeting. Click here to read what he had to say.

Metro Council proposes classes for Codes Offenders

Metro Council proposes classes for code offenders
Metro Council proposes classes for code offenders
Macaela Bennett, mbennett@tennessean.com 3:45 p.m. CDT May 25, 2015
http://www.tennessean.com/story/news/2015/05/25/council-proposes-classes-code-offenders/27831279/http://www.tennessean.com/story/news/2015/05/25/council-proposes-classes-code-offenders/27831279/

Think of it as traffic school for piling trash in your yard or neglecting to mow the lawn for many months.
Metro council passed a proposal sponsored by council members Fabian Bedne and Karen Johnson on first reading Tuesday that would open a "Codes Violator School" similar to the format of traffic violation classes.
"It's a constant struggle to have code issues addressed," Johnson said. "We came to the conclusion that we have got to do something because the process as is is not responsive and not working."
Right now when a code violation is reported, the code inspector gives the homeowner 30 days to fix the issue and those who don't meet that deadline are given a citation and a court date. Afterward, the judge determines the violator's penalty.
"This (class) is another tool the judge can use if he feels that it's the best way to deal with the issue," Bedne said. "I expect them to use this tool in a surgical way and not just throw it at everyone."
According to Bedne and Johnson, the current system leaves many issues unresolved as some violators often don't make an effort to comply or show up for their court dates.
For instance, Johnson said she regularly passes a house that has unresolved violations for at least three years.
"When I called a neighbor to ask about it (the problem house), he said he had given up because he doesn't understand why something clearly presenting a safety issue to him and other neighbors takes so long to get resolved," Johnson said.
And this is not an isolated incident, she said.
Bedne said he believes many residents do not understand that codes are in place to protect everyone's safety. He said this school would induce higher compliance by providing students an understanding of the reason for the city's standards.
"Trash piled in a yard is not just aesthetically displeasing, it's a health issue. It attracts vermin that can spread to neighbors' homes," Bedne said. "This is an opportunity for someone who is not understanding why codes are important to them, their neighbors and the city."
Both council members say their proposal has been well received by their constituents and the rest of council.
"I've already had people emailing and calling me saying it is a good idea," Johnson said. "Ultimately what we want to accomplish is a reduction of property issues that cause safety problems, educate people why it is important to keep their property safe and reduce the number of things council members have to follow up on."
The proposal must pass through two more readings before becoming law. If the Metro council approves the class, each would cost around $90 at the student's expense.
Reach Macaela Bennett at 615-259-8089 and on Twitter @Macaela_.

Memorial Day Message

As the wife of a military Marine veteran, I join everyone today to celebrate Memorial Day as we pay tribute and pray for the fallen. May we never forget those who have served and those who have given the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom.

Thursday, May 14, 2015

Shred It Community Day and E-Waste in Southeast Nashville

A special thanks to all who came out to volunteer for our district wide cleanup last weekend. (Pictures will be posted soon. We are waiting on the photographer to send them). We had a scheduling mixup with Shred-It, but no worries, they graciously scheduled for this Saturday. Additionally, the airport which is right up the road is also having a e-waste. Two weekends to clean up and clean out. Have a great weekend!



'Seal of approval': CHS expansion bolsters Antioch developers

'Seal of approval': CHS expansion bolsters Antioch developers

http://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/blog/real-estate/2015/05/seal-of-approval-chs-expansion-bolsters-antioch.html?ana=twt

Updated

Community Health to create 1,600 jobs in Antioch

Community Health to create 1,600 jobs in Antioch

http://www.tennessean.com/story/news/politics/2015/05/14/haslam-announce-significant-economic-development-deal/27291317/

Getahn Ward and Dave Boucher, dboucher@tennessean.com 3:47 p.m. CDT May 14, 2015 

 

 

Under the plan, Community Health's six-story, 240,000-square-foot shared services center would be built on 35 acres the chain plans to buy from developer Oldacre McDonald LLC. The center is expected to open in early 2017 near Cane Ridge Road around Interstate 24 and Bell Road.
"It's the spark that's going to really light the fuse that I think will lead to many, many more announcements over the next few years," Mark McDonald, a partner in Nashville-based Oldacre McDonald, said about landing Community Health. "It's kind of a good housekeeping seal of approval when you have such a respected company choose to locate in this location and bring this many jobs. I think it just accelerates all of our plans."
Community Health's center is part of Oldacre McDonald's 300-acre mixed-use project that is expected to include residential, retail, office and hotel uses, along with community and green spaces and pedestrian walkways. Smith cited land cost and an opportunity to meet the company's long-term needs among factors in its choice of the Antioch location.
"We make our decisions based on business, not on politics," Smith said in a reference to reports that Community Health sought support from state lawmakers from Williamson County for the failed Insure Tennessee program while considering locations.
Community Health could receive incentives estimated at $8 million from Metro, including property tax abatements of 100 percent in year one and two, 60 percent in years two through 10 and 25 percent in years 11 and 12. The company also is eligible for state job training and infrastructure grants.
With Community Health part of the larger mixed-use project, McDonald is optimistic about getting approval for a sought-after expansion of Exit 60 (Hickory Hollow Parkway) off I-24 and other roadways to improve access to his company's planned development.
If the interchange is approved by the U.S. Federal Highway Administration and designated a high priority project, next year would be the earliest that engineering and design can begin, said Michael Skipper, executive director of the Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization, a seven-county regional transportation planning body.
Ben Freeland, an Antioch-area car dealer and board member of community organization Crossings Nashville Action Partnership, attended Community Health's announcement. "It's excellent for the community," Freeland said, citing other recent expansions planned by companies including Mac Papers.
Nashville Mayor Karl Dean called growth in Antioch an example of a strong public-private partnership.
"When a city shows that it has the confidence to invest in itself, people take notice and private investment follows," he said, citing public investments in that area including a satellite campus for Nashville State Community College, a community center, library and park, as well as the Ford Ice Center partnership with the Nashville Predators. "Antioch is back big time."
Reach Getahn Ward at 615-726-5968 and on Twitter @getahn.

CHS confirms massive $66M Antioch expansion

CHS confirms massive $66M Antioch expansion

http://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/blog/health-care/2015/05/chs-confirms-massive-66antioch-expansion.html?ana=e_du_pub&s=article_d

Updated










Wayne Smith is CEO of Community Health Systems.

Wayne Smith is CEO of Community Health Systems.

Community Health Systems Inc. confirmed its plans today for a massive expansion in Antioch.
The nation's largest hospital operator, with more than $6 billion in market capitalization, said Thursday morning it is investing $66 million in a new back-office expansion expected to bring almost 1,600 new jobs to Davidson County in the next five years. The office, housing support personnel, is expected to be part of a development pursued by Nashville developer Oldacre McDonald and Atlanta developer TPA Group. It should be operational in 2017, according to a news release.
Nashville Business Journal was the first to report this week that CHS had settled on the Oldacre McDonald site on land at exit 60 of Interstate 24, which is on the opposite side of the highway from the former Hickory Hollow Mall. The hospital giant had previously been under contract to buy 22-acres in Cool Springs to build additional office space, a deal CHS walked away from about three months ago. 
The new office in Antioch will be a six-story, 240,000-square-foot facility. Four-hundred existing CHS employees will also work at the office, according to CHS spokeswoman Tomi Galin.
The majority of the new jobs will come from the consolidation of back-office functions at CHS hospitals, located in 29 states. Because of the consolidation, the new office will more likely represent a net reduction in the company's total workforce than a net increase, according to Wayne Smith, chairman and CEO of Community Health Systems.
CHS said the expansion stems from growth following its $7.6 billion acquisition of Health Management Associates last year, which brought more than 70 more hospitals under CHS' control nationwide. It's a search the company started last August, as Nashville Business Journal has previously reported.

“We’ve known for thirty years that Middle Tennessee is a great place to do business. We looked at many states and sites for this expansion and ultimately determined that Middle Tennessee offers the business environment, skilled workforce and quality of life to support our growth,” Smith said in a news release. “We are delighted to create new jobs in our home state and that our progress also means a direct and positive economic impact for Middle Tennessee.”
For Antioch, the investment by CHS is another boost to the Nashville suburb, where both Aramark and Asurion have added support operations in the past year expected to ultimately add thousands of jobs.
CHS' expansion into Davidson County also comes at the expense of Franklin, the health care giant's home. Although Smith stressed the company will not be leaving Williamson County - where it is one of the county's largest employers - the company had previously eyed a site near its current headquarters.



Multiple political and economic development sources have told Nashville Business Journal that CHS butted heads with Williamson County lawmakers over their opposition to Insure Tennessee, Gov. Bill Haslam's plan to expand health insurance coverage to 280,000 Tennessee, which was supported by hospitals like CHS in part because it would reduce the unpaid care they provide. That proposal was killed twice at the committee level earlier this year. About a week after Insure Tennessee failed the first time, Nashville Business Journal reported CHS had reset its search for additional office space, including sites in Davidson County.
One political operative, speaking on background and not for attribution, characterized the company's legislative approach as black-and-white: Either you're with us or against us. Sources said opposition to Insure Tennessee by Franklin lawmakers may have led CHS to drop its expansion in Cool Springs and look elsewhere.
One state lawmaker in Franklin, Rep. Jeremy Durham, argued that point to The Tennessean Wednesday.
"My impression is the move to Antioch rather than expanding in Williamson County is tied to the legislative delegation not supporting Insure Tennessee," Durham, the Republican House Majority Whip, told The Tennessean, adding the expansion in Antioch "suggest that they wanted to punish us for taking a position against Insure Tennessee."
According to the newspaper, CHS met with Williamson County lawmakers on Jan. 20, the day after the company received approval from the Williamson County Industrial Development Board for its now-scrapped Williamson County expansion. Durham and Rep. Charles Sargent, R-Franklin, told The Tennessean the conversation at that January meeting centered on the Franklin lawmakers' position on Insure Tennessee.
Galin told The Tennessean Wednesday the company's decision was tied to a number of factors.
In remarks at the announcement Thursday morning, Smith didn't address Insure Tennessee, though he did field questions on it after the event. He said CHS chose Antioch because of land costs, ability to expand there again, long-term flexibility, workforce and incentives.