Monday, June 22, 2015

The Result! Last post on this. Community...The People Prevail. Thanks to all who helped in this Victory.

The Result! Last post on this. Community...The People Prevail. Thanks to all who helped in this Victory.

Three State Lawmakers Join Opposition To Moving Nashville's Jail

Three State Lawmakers Join Opposition To Moving Nashville's Jail 

Jun 8, 2015 
 
Opposition continues to mount against a plan to relocate Nashville’s jail. Three state lawmakers who represent the city wrote a letter Monday against the idea.
The lawmakers didn’t hold back, saying that Southeast Nashville has been under attack and that building a new jail in that part of the county would have a lasting and negative impact.
In the letter, representatives Mike Stewart, Jason Powell and Sherry Jones said the idea of moving the jail out of downtown caught residents by surprise.
They asked why Mayor Karl Dean and Sheriff Daron Hall haven’t provided more information about other possible locations. And they said the jail would stunt business development, endanger neighbors and slow the wheels of the justice system — given that the jail would no longer be located next to the county courthouse.
More: Read the lawmakers' full letter
The proposal by the mayor and the sheriff would do away with the deteriorating jail downtown and build a new one on land the city already owns. Construction cost is estimated at $110 million.
The council will debate the future of the jail on Tuesday before voting on which of the city’s capital improvement projects to fund this year.

Mayoral candidates respond to flood wall, police HQ, jail defeats

Mayoral candidates respond to flood wall, police HQ, jail defeats

 http://www.tennessean.com/story/insession/2015/06/10/mayoral-candidates-respond-to-flood-wall-police-hq-jail-defeats/71017296/

Joey Garrison, jgarrison@tennessean.com 4:57 p.m. CDT June 10, 2015

Not surprisingly, Nashville's mayoral candidates have started to weigh in on the Metro Council's rejection Tuesday of a trio of controversial projects pushed by Mayor Karl Dean.
In a blow to the current mayor, the council voted to yank funding for a $100 million downtown flood wall and protection system, a $113 million jail consolidation and a $23 million police headquarters
Bill Freeman and Jeremy Kane were the first two mayoral candidates to issue statements. The Tennessean will post other responses when we get them.
Bill Freeman:
"​Tonight, the people of Nashville raised their voices and demanded they be heard about the future of their neighborhoods.
​ I respect Karl Dean for raising these issues but the lack of public engagement resulted in the failure of all three projects before the Metro Council tonight.
​ If the voters give me the chance to go to work for them, I pledge that as Mayor my administration will be transparent and we will listen to the people of Nashville.
​ I believe by engaging the public in the planning and discussion we can find a location for the new police headquarters, we can protect downtown, as well as the other neighborhoods of Nashville from a 1,000-year flood and we can find the appropriate location for a new jail.
Tonight we saw yet again that the people of Nashville are committed to protecting their neighborhoods and their quality of life. As mayor, I look forward to leading these discussions and uniting our community."
Jeremy Kane:
"Last night once again made clear that Nashvillians expect our leaders to be bold enough to offer innovative solutions but committed enough to listen to and collaborate with our neighborhoods. The hard work is still ahead -- three major projects were defeated and many more long-standing challenges remain. That's why it is critical the next mayor has the experience to practice real partnership, the humility to share information and ask for support, and a record of leadership to relentlessly advocate for all of our neighborhoods. I learned these values and gained this experience founding and growing a system of schools, that, in partnership with our communities and MNPS, changed the way we educate students. I look forward to bringing that same innovative, energetic, and humble approach to the mayor's office and can't wait to get started."
Howard Gentry, through spokeswoman Carol Brown Andrews:
"Howard believes the Council made the right decisions on each of these issues because the communities were not consulted before the plans were in place. As mayor, Howard Gentry will bring people to the table to hear their ideas and concerns as part of the planning process for major projects because his style is to be an inclusive, proactive leader."
Linda Eskind Rebrovick:
"Based on the public information available, I was supportive of the downtown flood protection program because I think we have to take the necessary measures to protect lives and businesses here in Nashville, and that will be my first priority as mayor," said Rebrovick. "Over the last decade we've seen a tremendous increase is the number of residents living downtown, and we can't risk another flood that jeopardizes human lives and businesses. I believe Scott Potter and other Metro officials identified the most responsible option with this flood protection program."
As for the defeat of the proposed relocation of the downtown jail to Antioch, Rebrovick highlights the importance of community input on the front end of decisions that impact neighborhoods in Davidson County.
"I have learned through 39 years in business and the community, we must bring all stakeholders to the table when evaluating important decisions, and that has to include the community's input," said Rebrovick. "The Southeast Nashville community has been very vocal in its opposition to the relocation of the jail, including collecting 1,000 petition signatures, because the move would have had a direct impact on their quality of life. As mayor, I will look for ways to improve the process of collecting community input and communicating with all stakeholders prior to making big decisions like this."
Rebrovick has pointed to the fact that Metro has a lot of vacant and underused property that could be leveraged for affordable housing, and says this vacant property could also be considered for projects like the new jail and the north police precinct. If the locations already identified are the most suitable for these types of developments, the data and recommendations should be shared with the local communities to explain why the decisions are being made.
"The North Nashville police precinct is also an issue where the community wasn't involved early enough in the process, but it's a different situation than what Antioch was facing," said Rebrovick. "In this case, there could be a benefit to the Jefferson Street corridor in the form of new growth and increased public safety, but nevertheless, the community's voice should have been taken into consideration prior to making a decision that affects residents in the area. Again, I would look for ways to better communicate proposals like this with community stakeholders before moving ahead with a project."
Charles Robert Bone:
"These are important issues, but we should learn from this experience that leadership has important stages, only the first of which is vision. Explaining the vision and earning community support are just as important. The people in our neighborhoods and communities matter. We need to ensure that we seek collaboration and solicit community input on big capital projects. As mayor, I'll seek to be bold enough to maintain our momentum and responsible enough to diversify our prosperity and investments for all of Nashville.
Megan Barry (an at-large Metro councilwoman, who voted Tuesday to keep funding for the flood wall, but to pull funds for the jail proposal and police headquarters):
Last night, I supported the flood protection system downtown because I believe we should learn our lessons from 2010 and take proactive steps to mitigate a future disaster. But I also understand that many around Nashville were concerned that more action wasn't being taken to protect all parts of the county. As mayor, I will work with the Metro Water Services, the Army Corps of Engineers, and the citizens of Nashville to put forward a comprehensive plan that addresses flood protection from Bellevue to Southeast Nashville and every area in-between.
With respect to the Criminal Justice Center, I believe that moving the jail facilities to Antioch is the wrong thing to do, and I'm encouraged by reports indicating Sheriff Hall will look at renovating the existing facilities downtown, which will also drive the conversations about the new police headquarters. As mayor, I will work with our public safety officials to make sure that our police officers, firefighters, and Sheriff's department have great facilities and the equipment they need do their jobs while staying safe.

Sheriff: Current Metro jail likely to be gutted, renovated

Sheriff: Current Metro jail likely to be gutted, renovated

Published: Updated:

http://wkrn.com/2015/06/10/sheriff-hall-says-hell-likely-gut-and-renovate-current-meto-jail/

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – Davidson County Sheriff Daron Hall said Wednesday it’s likely the current downtown Metro facilities will be gutted in order to renovate it with the $113 million approved by the Metro Council in the capital budget Tuesday night.
His words come less than 24 hours after the council voted 36-0 in favor of renovating the jail after they removed funding to relocate and consolidate it with rest of the Davidson County Sheriff’s Office facilities in southeast Nashville, a proposal that garnered controversy and backlash from residents in the area.
Sheriff Hall said when the mayor first announced the proposal, he supported it, believing it was the right thing to do.
But as time went on, it became clear if the proposal was rejected, they would be left with nothing.
“One of my themes has been doing nothing is not an option,” the sheriff told News 2. “We really have to do something.”
He continued, “I sent an email out yesterday morning to all the council members as one last, I think two, three lines in an email that just said, ‘I understand a lot of controversy, but understand if you take that money out and don’t support it, we’re at zero, and we have facilities that are in dire need.”
After all is said and done, Sheriff Hall noted the whole process, from the announcement of Mayor Dean’s proposal to Tuesday night’s vote, was one that left lessons in its wake.
“I think there’s been some lessons to be learned, to be honest with you. We could have done things better on our part,” the sheriff told News 2. “I think the mayor’s office did everything I would’ve asked them to do by putting it in their budget, but you didn’t have a long time to communicate with the community like I think we wanted to do.”
Sheriff Hall said conversations have already begun around the process of remodeling and renovating the current facilities at the Criminal Justice Center (CJC) downtown.
“We had a process in place with the other one in drawings and designs and schematics. We have nothing today, but we have the money to go forward and start that process,” the sheriff explained.
As for what’s next, Sheriff Hall said he thinks the entire building will need to be gutted in order to re-do and enlarge many areas.
“I’ve talked with the finance office and I’ve talked with the legal department, and I’m quite comfortable that July 1 this money’s available for this purpose only,” the sheriff added.
He said he’d like to bring consultants in to study and discuss what demolishing a building like the CJC would mean in an area like downtown, as well as what it would cost.
Hall is hoping to get those consultants on board early July.

 

Metro Council Removes Jail Move, Police HQ Move, Flood Wall from Budget

Metro Council Removes Jail Move, Police HQ Move, Flood Wall from Budget

http://fox17.com/m/news/features/top-stories/stories/Metro-Council-Removes-Jail-Move-Flood-Wall-from-Budget-147101.shtml#.VYjPxkbby1x

Stream WZTV Fox 17 Newscasts LIVE starting with Fox 17 This Morning at 4:30am, News at 5:30pm and News at 9pm & 10 pm.
Metro Council voted Tuesday to remove the $100-million dollar flood wall and the relocation of the jail to Antioch and the headquarters of the Metro Police from the budget. FOX 17's Sky Arnold is at the meeting and will report LIVE on FOX 17 News at 9pm.
Sheriff Daron Hall released a statement regarding news that the jail won't be moved, saying he hopes next mayor will take on issue.
"Tonight’s council vote to remove funding for the relocation of our operations to Southeast Nashville was a very important decision for our city. As we have said, doing nothing about the conditions and long range future of our downtown facilities is not an option. The issues at the Criminal Justice Center are well documented and need serious attention now," Hall said. "My hope is that the serious problems we face will remain at the forefront as a new mayor and city council take office later this year."

Mayor Karl Dean released a statement, expressing his disappointment with all three proposals being rejected.

"The Council has voted, and I thank them for their consideration. Obviously, I am disappointed in the results of three crucial votes removing needed projects from the city’s capital improvement budget. Each of these proposals would have funded important public safety infrastructure that the city shouldn’t put off. I hope these projects will be taken up by the next administration and Council because these issues aren’t going away.

In my eight years in office, our city has experienced two 500-year flood events. Moving forward with the flood protection system would have been the responsible thing to do as we work to protect all of Nashville from future floods. Downtown is the cultural heart and economic engine of Nashville, so it is unfortunate that we will not be protecting the downtown jobs and residents that add to our entire city’s vitality. I am disappointed for the many Nashvillians – including downtown businesses and neighbors from every part of our city – who worked hard in support of flood protection for our city.

Relocating the police headquarters and Sheriff’s operations would have set up the city’s public safety infrastructure for decades to come. Chief Anderson has long been committed to building strong community-police relations throughout our city, and we offered a community process to try to determine the best location for the headquarters facility. Sheriff Hall made the case that centralizing the Sheriff’s operations was the most financially sound decision to make. The proposed site already houses hundreds of inmates on property owned by the city and out of view of the general public. Our city needs public safety facilities that are safe and efficient.

I want to thank the Council for approving the rest of the capital spending plan, which will fund a new Family Justice Center on Murfreesboro Road, renovations of Overton and Martin Luther King Jr. high schools, a new elementary school in Cane Ridge, new community centers, $25 million for sidewalks, $18 million for open space acquisition and numerous other projects that will benefit our great city."

Plan To Move Nashville's Jail And Police Headquarters Meets Wall Of Resistance

Plan To Move Nashville's Jail And Police Headquarters Meets Wall Of Resistance 

http://nashvillepublicradio.org/post/plan-move-nashvilles-jail-and-police-headquarters-meets-wall-resistance

Jun 3, 2015 

A controversial proposal to relocate Davidson County’s jail from downtown to southeast Nashville took a pummeling Tuesday night during a public hearing in front of the Metro Council. Dozens of residents who live nearby spoke in opposition.
Relocating Nashville’s jail wasn’t the only reason that public comments lasted nearly three hours. But of a handful of proposals that made for an at-times rowdy budget hearing, it was the jail that increased the intensity.
There has been opposition since the day that Mayor Karl Dean and Sheriff Daron Hall announced intentions to close the aging downtown jail. They provided a tour of the 30-year-old facility and laid out a plan to build a new, $110-million jail on city land off of Harding Place.
But many said there hasn’t been enough thought about the impact, and they want to know why the old jail shouldn’t simply be repaired. Resident Karen Kelley said building new doesn’t sit well with her neighborhood.
“Our sheriff compared this move to a car. ‘You don’t keep working on your old car. You go out and buy a new one when it becomes too expensive,’ " Kelley said. "Well, where I live, no, you keep working on your car.”
Kelley and others provided a long list of concerns if the jail were to move, including releasing criminals into the area and the lack of nearby support services for offenders in need.
There were five who spoke in favor, although everyone who supported the jail idea also worked for the sheriff’s office. Evin Baylis lives near the proposed site, where Metro already has some jail facilities. He said he’s never seen a problem spill into the neighborhood.
“There’s currently jails that are operating there and the addition of another is not going to change my day-to-day dealings with that community. I’m a consumer of that area,” Baylis said.
The jail plan, along with all of the capital projects, still awaits a final vote this month, but the fate of the project has never been more in doubt. Before the meeting ended, council members threatened to pull funding from the relocation plan.

Metro Council Cuts Funding for Flood Wall, Jail, Police Headquarters

Metro Council Cuts Funding for Flood Wall, Jail, Police Headquarters 

http://nashvillepublicradio.org/post/metro-council-cuts-funding-flood-wall-jail-police-headquarters

Jun 10, 2015

The Metro Council pushed back against Mayor Karl Dean Tuesday night and eliminated funding for the three biggest city projects in his proposed budget. The council had a tense debate and close votes for all three.
There were cheers when the council voted not to pay for a new police headquarters on Jefferson Street. They won’t pay for a new jail either. And the idea of building a flood wall for downtown Nashville — that failed as well.
“Should all the taxpayers in Nashville have to pay for this flood wall downtown? Or should the people downtown who are going to get the benefit of the flood wall pay for the flood wall?" said councilman Carter Todd. "My other big question is: Will this flood wall actually work?”
Todd tapped into one of the concerns that surfaced repeatedly: location. There were also questions about the impact of each large proposal.
Nashville flood wall
Site work had started on a flood wall to protect downtown Nashville, but opposition grew and the Metro Council removed funding from the budget.
Credit Emily Siner / WPLN
Opponents said the downtown flood wall would not protect enough of the county. They said a new jail and a new police headquarters would be too intrusive into some neighborhoods.
In the end, citizen outcry got the council’s attention. During four hours of debate, council members repeatedly cited a lack of community input into the mayor’s plans. Councilman Duane Dominy said the process was moving too fast, especially for projects with a combined price tag of $225 million.
“I’m not opposed to improving the jail. I’m not opposed to moving the jail," Dominy said. "But we as a body should fully and properly vet when we’re making the largest investment in the public safety of this city.”
The defeated projects were part of the city’s construction and capital improvements budget, which still tops $400 million. The council did put $113 million into the budget to renovate the existing jail if the mayor now chooses to pivot in that direction.
The council also approved funding for school renovations, upgrades at fire stations, a new community center in Madison and record-setting funding for new sidewalks.
Councilman Duane Dominy
Councilman Duane Dominy votes Tuesday to pull high-cost projects out of the capital improvements budget.
Credit Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Nashville flood wall, jail plan, police HQ move rejected

Nashville flood wall, jail plan, police HQ move rejected

 http://www.tennessean.com/story/news/politics/2015/06/09/nashville-flood-wall-jail-plan-police-hq-move-all-rejected/28771783/?hootPostID=d85de4112ca3722eb6f3cee80f9d9284

Joey Garrison, jgarrison@tennessean.com 11:04 a.m. CDT June 10, 2015

Mayor Karl Dean was dealt a clean sweep of defeats Tuesday by the Metro Council, which rejected three controversial and expensive municipal projects he had sought to pass before leaving office.
Citing a lack of proper vetting for each, the council voted separately Tuesday to kill funding for a $100 million downtown flood wall and protection system, a $113 million jail consolidation in Southeast Nashville as well as a $23 million police headquarters proposed for North Nashville.
The council later approved Dean's $520 million 2015-16 capital plan, which includes substantial dollars for school buildings and sidewalk paving — but no longer projects that have divided much of Davidson County.
The defeats mark a decisive blow for term-limited Dean before he exits the mayor's office in September. Some council members noted his impending departure and said it would be better to let the next mayor decide whether they are projects worth pursuing.
"If any of these are good projects now, then they will be good projects 90 days from now," at-large councilman Tim Garrett said. "I really think that's where they need to be — with the next administration."
"Let's slow down and get all the facts about these big projects," echoed Metro councilman Carter Todd, a usual Dean ally on most projects. "For some reason, this mayor seems to be rushing here at the very end to get a bunch of large capital projects done without doing all of the homework."
Defeats came via three separate amendments during a heated meeting. The council voted 19-18 to pull funds for the flood wall and protection system. It later voted 19-17 to remove funds for the jail relocation and then 22-14 to block the relocation of the police headquarters. Each project came out of the mayor's 2015-16 capital improvements budget. There were two abstentions on all three votes.
"Obviously, I am disappointed in the results of three crucial votes removing needed projects from the city's capital improvement budget," Dean said in a statement. "Each of these proposals would have funded important public safety infrastructure that the city shouldn't put off. I hope these projects will be taken up by the next administration and council because these issues aren't going away."
Council action followed an impassioned three-hour public hearing on the issues last week.
With the downtown flood wall and protection system, Dean had gotten an assist last week from the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce, which reinforced its support by calling the project key to protecting the city's cultural heart and economic engine. They reminded Nashvillians that around 18 percent of all tax revenue in Nashville is generated from downtown.
But the project never overcame skeptical council members, who on Tuesday questioned why federal funding wasn't more aggressively sought. They also reminded their colleagues that residential neighborhoods were hit equally, if not worse, by the 2010 flood that prompted the downtown flood wall in the first place.
"To talk about the economic center of downtown is basically telling our neighborhoods you're not as important," at-large councilman Charlie Tygard said. "That's the problem I have with this."
Davidson County Sheriff Daron Hall has pushed hard for a new jail facility on Harding Place to replace operations within the aging downtown Criminal Justice Center. The Metro police headquarters would have relocated from the same downtown facility to Jefferson Street under a proposal Dean announced in April.

But Antioch-area council members continued their complaints over transparency on Tuesday, arguing they were never given a chance — or even time — to weigh in on what would be the largest public safety investment in Nashville's history.
"Have we involved the community at any point in this process?" said Antioch councilman Duane Dominy, looking toward the council gallery where many jail critics had gathered. "No."
In a statement, Hall called the removal of funding a "very important decision for our city" and offered hope that the issue will remain at the forefront of discussion for the next mayor and council.
"As we have said, doing nothing about the conditions and long-range future of our downtown facilities is not an option," Hall said. "The issues at the Criminal Justice Center are well documented and need serious attention now."
Organizations in North Nashville in recent days had issued split opinions on the police headquarters for Jefferson Street. A group of businesses merchants in the area had said it supported the proposal, calling the headquarters a possible catalyst for a corridor that contains several blighted buildings. Others, including the Justice for Jefferson Street Coalition and the Tennessee State University Community Coalition, have remained opposed.
The latter groups raised fears over potential racial profiling that they said could result along the historically African-America corridor, even though Dean has been adamant that the police headquarters would house only administrative offices.
The mayor last week sought a compromise by vowing to hold further community meetings on the police headquarters proposal even if the council were to have authorized funding. He had said those meetings would then dictate whether Jefferson Street is the best area or if new locations should be explored.
But councilwoman Erica Gilmore, who represents the area, said Tuesday that opposition had proven to be "really overwhelming for the community."
"I'm not against development, but it has to be the right kind of development," she said. "And the people have spoken against it."
Tuesday's meeting turned particularly heated on two occasions. Dominy, as he interrogated Metro Finance Director Rich Riebeling on the jail plan, appeared to accuse the finance director of lying about the proposal. That prompted Riebeling to point from across the council chambers toward Dominy and say, "You don't call me a liar."
Earlier, Councilman Todd charged that "backroom" trades had taken place by the administration. Mayor's Office of Economic and Community Development Director Matt Wiltshire responded to that accusation by storming out of the council chambers.
In the end, the latest string of defeats adds to the redevelopment of the fairgrounds and Amp bus rapid transit proposal as projects that Dean was unable to get approved amid fierce public resistance.
In the latest case, the mayor was rejected on three proposals in three different parts of the county. Each had one underlying complaint: a lack of front-end community input.
"We have created discord in this city like I have never seen," councilwoman Jacobia Dowell of Antioch said prior to the votes. "Not only community discord but we have different communities that are being pitted against other communities. The suburbs against the core. For downtown or against downtown.
"All of these proposals — this headquarters, this flood wall and this jail — I believe that if they were presented to the community and we had time for a conversation, we might have come up with some kind of resolution."
Reach Joey Garrison at 615-259-8236 and on Twitter @joeygarrison.

$250M sliced from Mayor Dean’s capital budget at Metro Council

http://wkrn.com/2015/06/09/fate-of-several-major-nashville-projects-in-hands-of-metro-council/

http://wkrn.com/2015/06/09/fate-of-several-major-nashville-projects-in-hands-of-metro-council/

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – Nearly $250 million was sliced from Mayor Karl Dean’s capital budget in Tuesday night’s Metro Council meeting.
First the council voted to remove the $100 million flood protection plan aimed to protect Nashville from catastrophic event like the flood of May 2010.
Council members then voted to remove $113 million to relocate the main Metro jail from downtown to consolidate it with other Davidson County Sheriff’s Office facilities in southeast Nashville.
Instead, the council voted 36-0 to renovate the current jail downtown.
And lastly, plans to relocate the Metro police headquarters to Jefferson Street in north Nashville also lost $23 million in proposed funding.
All three projects have faced various levels of support and opposition after being proposed by the mayor earlier this spring.
Mayor Karl Dean released a statement following the votes saying he was “obviously” disappointed.
“Each of these proposals would have funded important public safety infrastructure that the city shouldn’t put off. I hope these projects will be taken up by the next administration and Council because these issues aren’t going away,” Mayor Dean continued.

Metro Council shoots down 3 divisive projects on mayor's budget

http://www.wsmv.com/clip/11583971/metro-council-shoots-down-3-divisive-projects-on-mayors-budget

http://www.wsmv.com/clip/11583971/metro-council-shoots-down-3-divisive-projects-on-mayors-budgethttp://www.wsmv.com/clip/11583971/metro-council-shoots-down-3-divisive-projects-on-mayors-budget

Posted: Jun 10, 2015 7:23 AM CST
NASHVILLE, TN (WSMV) - The Metro Council voted to pull funding for relocating the Metro police headquarters to Jefferson Street, moving the jail to Antioch and building a flood wall to protect downtown Nashville. (6/10/15)

Metro Council Votes To Remove Flood Wall, Jail & Police HQ From Budget



http://www.scrippsmedia.com/newschannel5/news/Metro-Council-To-Decide-Fate-Of-Jail-Police-HQ-Flood-Wall-306688541.html 


CREATED Jun 9, 2015 - UPDATED: Jun 9, 2015
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Metro Council members gaveled in for what turned out to be a contentious few hours, Tuesday evening and voted to remove three controversial items from the capital budget.
The proposed jail consolidation project on Harding Place, the police headquarters move to Jefferson Street and the downtown flood wall project were all removed from the capital budget. However, council members did vote to add money to renovate the current Criminal Justice Center downtown to the budget.
Just because money to renovate the CJC was included does not mean that is what will eventually happen.
Council members were not allowed to discuss how they’d vote or advocate for votes among their colleagues, so no one was quite sure how Tuesday night's vote would go.
Council members said the projects were sprung on them and the public with little information and little to no community involvement.
On the police headquarters funding, Councilmember Erica Gilmore said she wasn't able to answer her constiutents questions about the project, so she was forced to change her opinion on it.
"They said 'how does it look?' I don't know because we never had renderings. Normally with projects we usually have renderings," Gilmore said. "'What's the financial impact?' I don't know because we didn't get any of that."
Of both the police headquarters and the jail project, Councilmember Carter Todd said he couldn't give Mayor Karl Dean the benefit of the doubt like he had on the baseball stadium. Todd said that project came in millions over budget and without a parking garage.
Todd and others alleged too much was taking place out of the public's view.
"They're pushing too hard, pushing too fast," Todd said. "I'm hearing stories of backroom trades that would turn your stomach if they're true."
At-Large Councilmember Jerry Maynard had always been a strong supporter of the police headquarters moving to Jefferson Street.
Maynard said a majority of the businesses in the area supported the $23 million investment moving to the area, believing it would spur long-needed economic development.
"Don't take away this funding," Maynard said. "We had just a few people with loud mouths talk about their position on this."
Council members voted down the jail consolidation project by a vote of 19-17. Councilmembers Sandra Moore and Burkley Allen did not vote. Councilmembers Phil Claiborne and Sean McGuire were not present for the vote.
The police headquarters funding was rejected by a vote of 22-14. Councilmembers Anthony Davis and Jason Holleman did not vote. Claiborne and McGuire were not present.
The downtown flood wall was defeated by a vote of 19-18. Councilmembers Maynard and Fabian Bedne did not vote. McGuire was not present.
Community groups who had worked against the police and jail projects were ecstatic that their grassroots campaigns worked.
"It is time that they finally started listening to the people and they did that tonight," said Lorinda Hale who helped head up the group Southeast Nashville United. "Maybe, maybe the next mayor will understand you need to build consensus from the ground up. Do not try to shove projects down the throat of any community."
Sekou Franklin spoke on behalf of Justice For Jefferson Street and other groups who worked to defeat the relocation of the police headquarters.
"We never thought it was a done deal, contrary to what other people thought," he said. "If we could just explain to the indigenous people of North Nashville to fight with integrity, fight with humility and walk in the spirit of justice then whatever happens, happens."
Franklin says the groups were humbled that they were able to stop the projects.
Following the vote, Nashville Mayor Karl Dean released a statement, which read in part:
“The Council has voted, and I thank them for their consideration. Obviously, I am disappointed in the results of three crucial votes removing needed projects from the city’s capital improvement budget. Each of these proposals would have funded important public safety infrastructure that the city shouldn’t put off. I hope these projects will be taken up by the next administration and Council because these issues aren’t going away."
Davidson County Sheriff Daron Hall also said in a statement:
"Tonight’s council vote to remove funding for the relocation of our operations to Southeast Nashville was a very important decision for our city. As we have said, doing nothing about the conditions and long range future of our downtown facilities is not an option. The issues at the Criminal Justice Center are well documented and need serious attention now.
My hope is that the serious problems we face will remain at the forefront as a new mayor and city council take office later this year."
The council could vote to add any of the three projects back in this year.
However, it would take a super majority, or 27 of the 40 members, to do so.
Councilman Steve Glover withdrew his amendment filed Monday which would have stripped Southeast Nashville of $53 million in projects including an elementary school, a community center as well as parks and green space.

Controversial Metro Jail Location Discussion on NewsChannel 5+ OpenLine with Ben Hall, Councilwoman Karen Johnson and Councilman Duane Dominy

Catching up!  We all had to take a needed rest after our Victory!  Posting the articles for everyone who wants to read them who may have missed any.
Click on the picture or link below to view the OpenLine NewsChannel 5+ interview with Councilwoman Karen Johnson and Councilman Duane Dominy.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PSI3QBCTWKI 

Friday, June 5, 2015

Future Of Nashville Jail, Police Headquarters Move In Question

By Todd Walker. CREATED Jun 3, 2015
WTVF NewsChannel 5
http://www.scrippsmedia.com/newschannel5/news/Future-of-Nashville-jail-police-headquarters-move-in-question-306077331.html 
NASHVILLE, Tenn - The fate of the mayor's plan to move the jail and police headquarters out of downtown is now seriously in question after hundreds swarmed last night's Metro Council meeting.
Last night, Council Member Duane Dominy announced he was filing an amendment to pull the jail from the Capital Improvement Budget.
"If this is the largest investment in public safety across our city, we ought to have that discussion across the county of how we want to handle that," Dominy said. "I'm not opposed necessarily to moving the jail. I'm not opposed to consolidating things and putting them where they should be. The concern is we need to make sure that is the right place to put them."
Other council members from across the city quickly announced their support.
"Our role on Metro Council is to listen to the community," said At-Large Council Member Megan Barry. "We heard loud and clear from them last night."
Barry, a mayoral candidate, signed on as a co-sponsor of the amendment to remove the jail from the budget.
Until then, she had not taken a public position on the project.
"We heard from so many members in the southeast community last night that they want a lot more discussion before a jail ends up in their neighborhood and I am supporting that amendment with Duane to make that happen," she said.
As of Wednesday, that amendment did not include removing the proposed police headquarters from the budget.
The proposed Jefferson Street site is inside Council Member Erica Gilmore's district.
Gilmore recently announced she is running for an At-Large council seat.
Until Tuesday night, she had publicly been a supporter of the project, but said because of the outcry she couldn't vote for it anymore.
"I feel it needs more discussion," she said. "It needs more vetting and I think just out of respect I owe that to the community."
There is still plenty of support from council members for both projects, including At-Large Council Member Jerry Maynard, who has been working to revitalize the Jefferson Street area for years.
"I still believe that Jefferson Street is the right place for the headquarters, but if we have to wait until the next mayor to make that decision then that's just the facts and that's what we have to live with," he said by phone.
Council members expect the police headquarters to be included in the amendment by the final vote, Tuesday, June 9.
It's unclear if there is enough support from council members to get the projects pulled, but a week is a very long time in politics.
Sheriff Daron Hall released a statement Tuesday night saying, "As I have said from the start, doing nothing is not an option and supporting an amendment to remove this project from the Capital Improvement Budget would create a liability for the city. The experts have recommended, and I agree, that relocating our operations to the existing correctional property on Harding Place is the best move for Nashville. It is the most cost efficient option, and will increase public safety for all of us. I will continue to work with the council to move this project forward."
Council Member Phil Claiborne from Donelson has also filed an amendment to remove the downtown flood protection system from the budget.
He said right now he believes he has the votes to keep it out.
Amendments to the budget will be debated and voted on June 9. That night is the final vote on the budget.

Mayoral Candidate David Fox Makes Statement on Jails being Consolidated to Southeast Nashville

From Mayoral Candidate David Fox for Mayor Therese Brumfield posted
13 hrs · Edited David Fox Thank you!
From David Fox for Mayor- Therese, sorry for my slow response. (I'm a lot quicker on my cell phone.) I am persuaded that the downtown jail needs refurbishing or replacing. However, relocating a jail is a predictably controversial decision that requires broad community conversation. I don't yet know where a new jail should be located and don't think we can know until we have such a conversation. I regard the unilateral decision to place a new jail in Southeast Nashville as sadly disrespectful of residents in that neighborhood. As mayor, I will create a process for such critical decisions that is inclusive and transparent.

After Council Hearing, Barry Opposes Jail Relocation, Maynard Urges Support of Police HQ

Posted By on Wed, Jun 3, 2015 at 11:17 AM

http://www.nashvillescene.com/pitw/archives/2015/06/03/after-council-hearing-barry-opposes-jail-relocation-maynard-urges-support-of-police-hq

After nearly three hours of public comment Tuesday night on Mayor Karl Dean's proposed capital projects, council support for three items on his agenda is now seriously in doubt.
While downtown business owners and chamber of commerce representatives were out in force to support his proposal for a $100 million downtown flood protection system, including the much-discussed floodwall, there was almost total opposition to plans to relocate the downtown Criminal Justice Center, consolidating Sheriff's operations and relocating a jail to Metro-owned property in southeast Nashville (which already includes jails) and building a new Metro Police Department headquarters on Jefferson Street in North Nashville.
North Nashville activists have filed civil rights complaints with the state and federal governments over the proposed police headquarters and an opposition group from Southeast Nashville submitted a petition Tuesday night with more than 1,000 signatures against the proposed jail relocation.
After the hearing, council members Phil Claiborne and Duane Dominy announced plans to file amendments pulling funding from the flood protection system and the jail relocation respectively, and Councilwoman Erica Gilmore publicly withdrew her support of the plan to relocate police headquarters into her district.
On Wednesday morning, At-Large Councilwoman and mayoral candidate Megan Barry reiterated her support for the flood protection proposal, but announced that she had signed onto an amendment pulling the relocated jail out of the Capital Improvement Budget.
“I have heard loud and clear from residents in Southeast Nashville who are opposed to the relocation of the jail into their neighborhood," Barry said in a statement released by her campaign. "In addition, I have serious concerns about the ability for those who are served by the criminal justice system to access legal representation and transit if we were to move the jail from Downtown to Antioch. Last night, I joined my fellow councilmembers in signing on to an amendment that would take the proposed Southeast jail out of the Capital Improvement Budget."
She added that she "heard serious concerns about the relocation of the police headquarters to Jefferson Street" but said she "will be taking a closer look at that proposal over the next week."
At the same time, At-Large Councilman Jerry Maynard, who has already publicly confronted groups in North Nashville opposing the Jefferson Street police headquarters, sent an email to council members under the subject "Is this Justice?"
Dear Colleagues:
There are 13 Abandoned Buildings on Jefferson Street within a 7 Block Stretch. Below you will see just a few.
As you know many of us have worked tirelessly to Revitalize Jefferson Street. I have worked with SIX Developers to build Mixed Use and Multi Family projects on Jefferson Street over the past 8 years. But, when they see the neighborhood around them, they don't want to be the first to invest and take the risk.
That is why the Police HQ is great for the Community of Jefferson Street. Nashville's investment will show confidence and commitment to the area. This will encourage private developers to invest on Jefferson Street.
Finally, I ask one simple question, "Would you want a $23 Million Administrative Head Quarters in your District?"
If you answer yes, please support the relocation of the Police HQ!
Jerry Maynard
The council will take up final votes on the proposals, and amendments to pull specific projects, next Tuesday.

 

Barry opposes relocation of jail to Southeast Nashville

Joey Garrison, jgarrison@tennessean.com 11:59 a.m. CDT June 3, 2015
http://www.tennessean.com/story/insession/2015/06/03/barry-backs-effort-to-block-southeast-nashville-jail/28407127/

The only Nashville mayoral candidate who gets to vote on a trio of controversial projects pushed by Mayor Karl Dean says she supports a downtown flood wall and protection system but opposes relocating the city's downtown jail to Southeast Nashville.
Metro Councilwoman Megan Barry revealed those positions at a Monday candidate forum before formally outlining her stances Wednesday morning — the day after a passionate marathon public hearing on the issues at the Metro Council the previous night.
Barry said she has signed an amendment — one Councilman Duane Dominy plans to file — that would remove the proposed Southeast jail from the 2015-16 capital improvements budget. She also said that she would be taking a "closer look" at the police headquarters proposal for Jefferson Street in North Nashville over the weekend.
"I have heard loud and clear from residents in Southeast Nashville who are opposed to the relocation of the jail into their neighborhood," Barry said in a statement. "In addition, I have serious concerns about the ability for those who are served by the criminal justice system to access legal representation and transit if we were to move the jail from Downtown to Antioch."
Barry's opposition is not a good sign for a plan that Davidson County Sheriff Daron Hall has pushed to replace the downtown jail and other Sheriff's Office facilities located in the aging Criminal Justice Center.
Amendments to Dean's capital budget will be taken up on Tuesday.
At the same time, though, Barry says she will be voting for Dean's $100 million downtown flood protection system. After hearing from downtown stakeholders and talking to experts, she said she is "convinced that this is the right thing for Nashville to do."
Barry's full statement on the jail proposal, police headquarters plan and flood protection system is below:
"I believe that community members should be driving the discussion about the future of their neighborhoods."
"I have heard loud and clear from residents in Southeast Nashville who are opposed to the relocation of the jail into their neighborhood. In addition, I have serious concerns about the ability for those who are served by the criminal justice system to access legal representation and transit if we were to move the jail from Downtown to Antioch.
"Last night, I joined my fellow councilmembers in signing on to an amendment that would take the proposed Southeast jail out of the Capital Improvement Budget. In addition, I heard serious concerns about the relocation of the police headquarters to Jefferson Street, and will be taking a closer look at that proposal over the next week.
"Last night, I also heard from the members of the downtown neighborhood who strongly support the proposed flood protection program. If we know that we can prevent a natural disaster from causing damage and devastation to our economy and to the lives of Nashvillians, we should absolutely take steps to do so. Over the past few weeks I've talked to experts about this plan, and I am convinced that this is the right thing for Nashville to do.
"Since I've served on the Council, Nashville has invested millions of dollars in West Nashville, Pennington Bend and Bordeaux for flood mitigation - but we need to do more, and as mayor, I will work with the Metro Water Department, Army Corps of Engineers and the Metro Council to move forward with more flood mitigation in every part of Davidson County."

Tuesday, June 2, 2015

Reminder TONIGHT TUES June 2nd ONLY PUBLIC HEARING for All Jails in the city being located to Southeast Nashville 6 PM

PUBLIC HEARING

TONIGHT, TUESDAY JUNE 2, 2015

6 PM

Where:  Metro Historic Courthouse, 1 Public Square

This is your only chance to be heard.