Sunday, December 25, 2016

Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays! District 29 and Southeast Nashville Celebrates the Holidays!

I hope each and everyone is enjoying a peaceful, joyous and blessed filled Holiday!
Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!
Thank you to everyone for your care for others throughout our district and city this year.  Your  volunteerism for our Annual Events and Cleanups is so appreciated greatly.  It is what makes our Community so Great! Helping others and looking out for our neighbors is what makes our area of the city so special.  I wish you and your family continued prosperity and love.


 A SPECIAL CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEIGHBOR MR. DAVID SATTERFIELD OF 2928 KINWOOD DRIVE FOR BEING THE NEWSCHANNEL 5 HOLIDAY LIGHTS WINNER FOR METRO NASHVILLE

Pictured below is his beautiful home
Our Annual Christmas Holiday Event held each year at the beautiful lakeside YMCA Camp Widijiwagan was again a huge success.  Thank you to our incredible committee of volunteers Ms. Sue Paugh, Delishia (Dee) Porterfield, Rene Mercer, Phyllis and Leon Stinson, Lorinda Hale, Emily Hale, Alma Sanford, Brandon Harden, Cynthia Dirkson, Marilyn Metz, Mike Hassell, Karen VanCleave
Graphic Designer - Jessica Coleman, www.designsbyjcoleman.com
DJ - Jaye Roberts, J.F.E.V.R Enterprises
Entertainment - John F. Kennedy Middle School Students
Photography - Sarah Weiss, Mike and Karen VanCleave

Our event could not have been possible without our sponsors: THANK YOU!
Mayor Megan Barry, Vice Mayor David Briley, J.R. Andy Herrell with Crye Leike Realtors, District Attorney General Glenn Funk, Judge Steve Dozier, Juvenile Court Clerk David Smith, Judge Allegra Walker, Circuit Court Clerk Richard Rooker, Judge Lynda Jones,  County Clerk Brenda Wynn, County Trustee Charlie Cardwell, Judge Rachel L. Bell, Judge Randy Kennedy, Judge Amanda McClendon, Judge Kelvin Jones, Councilman At Large Jim Shulman, Councilman At Large Bob Mendes, Councilman At Large John Cooper,
Attorney David Waynick, Dr. Shawn Joseph, Hon. School Board Member Will Pinkston, Hon. School Board Member Tyese Hunter, Angelo's Picnic Pizza, H&T's Homecooking, Homestyle Bakery, Bell Road Church of the Nazarene, Duke & Misty at Antioch Shell, Ben Freeland - Freeland Chevrolet, Global Crossings, Shineworthy Tea, Holiday Inn at the Crossings, Omni Nashville Hotel

Grand Prize Winner -
Omni Package - Alexander & Beverly Parker of Nashboro Village
Pictured below
(They plan to use this for Valentines Day!)


PICTURES FROM OUR ANNUAL CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY PARTY
Click Here to View All Pictures




Council Recommends Metro School Board Require Seat Belts on Buses

http://www.newschannel5.com/news/council-recommends-metro-school-board-require-seat-belts-on-buses

http://www.newschannel5.com/news/council-recommends-metro-school-board-require-seat-belts-on-buses

http://www.newschannel5.com/news/council-recommends-metro-school-board-require-seat-belts-on-buses

http://www.newschannel5.com/news/council-recommends-metro-school-board-require-seat-belts-on-buses

NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Metro council members unanimously passed a resolution Tuesday night recommending school board officials require new buses be equipped with seat belts.
The topic about adding seatbelts to school buses has been a popular topic after November’s deadly Chattanooga school bus crash that killed six elementary school students.
Councilwoman Karen Y. Johnson said this topic has been discussed in the past.
“It's been a long-term conversation throughout the years but because of budget reasons it has always been off the table but I think that due to this tragedy that we just saw in Chattanooga, it has revised some of those conversations and the thinking of parents asking are my children safe,” Johnson said.
Metro School officials estimated seat belts would add $12,000 to the cost of each new bus.
 
School officials also said Metro will need to buy more buses because two children can sit on buses with seat belts compared to three.
Officials pointed out that every bus costs Metro $40,000 to 50,000 to operate each year.
Johnson said funding from the federal and state level will help.
"I think that there will be funding available to local municipalities and when that time comes I think we need to seriously consider factoring that in and looking at where we are at that point and then making a decision based on that funding and the local funding as well," she said.
Anna Shepherd with the Metro school board said keeping students safe is a no-brainer.
“It's tragic that it took six little babies to die that we're talking about this more seriously today than we were a year ago. A lot of times we are reactive instead of proactive and so if we can be proactive on this I think it's the right thing to do,” Shepherd said.
She said she knows council members realize equipping buses with seatbelts comes with a price.

“They know that we come to them for a final approval of our budget and so it's my hope that they will approve that expense for us without taking it away from another area.
Both Shepherd and Johnson agree you can’t put a price tag on the safety of children.

Councilwoman Karen Y. Johnson Elected to the National League of Cities Board of Directors

http://www.antiochtenn.com/2016/12/12/councilwoman-karen-y-johnson-elected-to-the-national-league-of-cities-board-of-directors/

 http://pridepublishinggroup.com/pride/2016/12/01/councilwoman-karen-y-johnson-elected-to-the-national-league-of-cities-board-of-directors/

 https://www.facebook.com/YLCNashville/posts/1222121747830748


PITTSBURGH – Karen Y. Johnson, Councilwoman, of Nashville, Tennessee, was elected to the National League of Cities (NLC) board of directors by NLC’s membership at the group’s annual business meeting this month at the 2016 City Summit in Pittsburgh. Johnson was elected to a TWO-year term and will play an important role as a leader of the nation’s largest and most representative membership and advocacy organization for city officials.

“I look forward to serving on NLC’s Board of Directors and helping to represent our city and other local elected officials in advocating for protection of local authority and addressing city legislative priorities important to NLC members,” Johnson said.
In her role on the Board, Johnson will meet throughout the year to guide NLC’s strategic direction and set the organization’s advocacy priorities and operational goals. Board members are selected by a 15-member nominating committee, and are confirmed by a vote by NLC’s membership.
“The National League of Cities board of directors serves a critical role in guiding our organization’s priorities and policies,” said Clarence E. Anthony, CEO and executive director of the National League of Cities (NLC). “I want to thank the members elected to the board for their service to our organization, and look forward to working with them during an important year for the nation’s cities.”
Around 3,000 local leaders and staff convened in Pittsburgh from Nov. 16-19 for the annual 2016 City Summit (formerly known as the Congress of Cities) to network, discuss city priorities and learn best practices. Mayors, council
Karen Johnson
Karen Johnson
members and city staff participated in informative workshops, took mobile tours and attended education sessions at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center in downtown Pittsburgh.
###
The National League of Cities (NLC) is dedicated to helping city leaders build better communities. NLC is a resource and advocate for 19,000 cities, towns and villages, representing more than 218 million Americans.